Water Resilience

Why Water Resilience Matters

Increasing pressure on water resources is the third important risk in this sector. Buildings will need to become increasingly water efficient as changes in water availability, particularly reductions in the summer, may lead to a less reliable supply. By the 2050s, the number of people in the UK living in areas affected by water supply-demand deficits could be between 27 million and 59 million.

Water Resilience Measures

Drought resistant planting, green roofs and green walls

Rainwater and grey water harvesting

Water efficient taps and shower heads

Water leak detection systems

Water saving toilets and urinal controls

Waterless urinals

Information
  • Drought Resistant Planting

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    Drought Resistant Planting and Green Roofs

    Drought resistant planting involves choosing trees, plants and grass which can survive with less rain fall, thereby mitigating the need for watering, whilst maintaining attractive landscaping. A green roof is a living roof that is either partially or completely covered with vegetation grown over a waterproofing membrane and other additional layers. A green wall can be a free standing or fix wall placed inside and outside of a building. This can be partially or completely covered and normally has its own water system.

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  • Rainwater Harvesting

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    Rainwater and Grey Water Harvesting

    Rainwater harvesting is the accumulation and deposition of rainwater for reuse before it reaches the aquifer. Grey water harvesting involves recycling wastewater generated from washing (including laundry and dishwashers), for uses such as WC flushing, landscape irrigation and constructed wetlands.

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  • Water Efficient Taps

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    Water Efficient Taps and Shower Heads

    Water Efficient Taps. In commercial premises around 25% of ‘domestic’ water is used when operating taps. To reduce this, water efficient taps can be brought as a unit or can be retrofitted. Traditional showers typically use between 12 and 16 litres per minute. Water efficient shower heads save water and energy by restricting the water flow, but whilst still maintaining the pressure.

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  • Water Leak Detection

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    Water Leak Detection Systems

    A leak detection system is used in buildings to help detect water leaks and to prevent the loss of property from water damage. There are various leak detection systems on the market, for more details of these click more information.

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  • Water Saving Toilets

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    Water Saving Toilets

    Toilets account for about 90% of water use for offices and public conveniences. As from January 2001, all new toilets installed in the UK had to have a maximum flush of 6 litres. Urinals can account for about 20% of office water use; many urinal controls can reduce water use by up to 75%. In order to further reduce the amount of water used during flushing there are several measures you can put in place.

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  • Waterless Urinals

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    Waterless Urinals

    Rather than flushing urine and associated odours down the drainage system with water, waterless urinals use a sealing liquid and/or microbiological (usually in the form of cartridges) action to mitigate odours.

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